LOGIN
Sam Glickstein
1
Apprentice
Founder, Biotrophics, LLC (Project Leader)
 · BaltimoreU.S.
Share
Report
Get Link
GENERAL

Welcome to all interested people!

I want to thank everyone who joins this project in advance for this very exciting opportunity to help Biotrophics, LLC establish a foothold in this nascent industry of sustainable protein. There’s a lot of work to do, but I am confident that insects will have a very sizable role in feeding our planet in the near, and far future. We are already at capacity with current levels of livestock, and insects will not only help to feed humans, but our pets, and our farm animals in a truly sustainable fashion.
I look forward to all contributions large and small, and establishing working relationships as well as friendships over this journey.

Contributions
Sam Glickstein

Explained the operation of a mealworm farm

4 likes 
Like
Award Contribution
Josh Pinkley
14
Mastermind
 · FredericktownU.S.
Share
Report
Get Link

Do you harvest the whole tray at once or do you leave some to keep the cycle going?
I’d love to read up on this if you have any links you could share.

Like
1 like 
Award Contribution
Sam Glickstein
1
Apprentice
Founder, Biotrophics, LLC (Project Leader)
 · BaltimoreU.S.
Share
Report
Get Link

Hi Josh, thanks for commenting.
Yes, you would harvest the whole tray. Let me compile some links and post them, that would probably be helpful to others as well.
Until then, here’s a brief expansion on the operational side of things:
The whole operation is similar to any farming operation out in a field, but the difference is that you’re responsible for keeping and maintaining your “seed crop”, or in this case, the adults that lay the eggs. The operation thus relies on the breeding rate of the beetles.
A reasonable number to consider is about 1-1.5% of your harvest is set aside to pupate and turn into adults (each female lays 200-500 eggs). The adult bins will have screening that is small enough to have the eggs and the newly hatched larvae drop into a bin below. Each week these new bins are brought to the growing area for the larvae to grow to harvest size.

Larvae take about 50 days to grow to “market size”, though this varies, and size is unimportant if they’re being converted to flour.
At harvest time, the entire bin is brought to a screen and dumped to separate the wheat bran (their feed), shed exoskeletons, and the larvae.

They are then cleaned, frozen to kill, flash boiled, and dehydrated for packing or milling.

Hope this helps!

Contribution

Explained the operation of a mealworm farm

Like
3 likes 
Award Contribution
Leave a reply...
DISCOVER
CHAT
HIRE
ACTIVITY
FEED
New Post
Help
Start Project
Online Users
Share Link
Write something before you submit it!
Photo updated
Request Sent!
Updated
Copied to Clipboard