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Rick Stone
Community Helper, Finance Guy, Ex-Lawyer
 · New YorkU.S.
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INSPIRATION

I am reading a book about Makers called “Makers: The New Industrial Revolution”, by Chris Anderson, the CEO of 3D Robotics and DIY Drones and the former Editor in Chief of Wired magazine. I want to share an incredibly relevant quote from this book, from pages 13-14, that I think everyone in the Collaborizm community will appreciate:

"We are all Makers. We are born Makers (just watch a child’s fascination with drawing, blocks, Lego, or crafts), and many of us retain that love in our hobbies and passions. It’s not just about workshops, garages, and man caves. If you love to cook, you’re a kitchen Maker and your stove is your workbench (homemade food is best, right?). If you love to plant, you’re a garden Maker. Knitting and sewing, scrap-booking, beading, and cross-stitching—all Making. These projects represent the ideas, dreams, and passions of millions of people. Most never leave the home, and that’s probably no bad thing. But one of the most profound shifts of the Web Age is that there is a new default of sharing online. If you do something, video it. If you video something, post it. If you post something, promote it to your friends. Projects shared online become inspiration for others and opportunities for collaboration. Individual Makers, globally connected this way, become a movement. Millions of DIYers, once working alone, suddenly start working together. Thus ideas, shared, turn into bigger ideas. Projects, shared, become group projects and more ambitious than any one person would attempt alone. And those projects can become the seeds of products, movements, even industries. The simple act of “making in public” can become the engine of innovation, even if that was not the intent. It is simply what ideas do: spread when shared. We’ve seen this play out on the Web many times. The first generation of Silicon Valley giants got their start in a garage, but they took decades to get big. Now companies start in dorm rooms and get big before their founders can graduate. You know why. Computers amplify human potential: they not only give people the “power to create but can also spread their ideas quickly, creating communities, markets, even movements. Now the same is happening with physical stuff. Despite our fascination with screens, we still live in the real world. It’s the food we eat, our homes, the clothes we wear, and the cars we drive. Our cities and gardens; our offices and our backyards. That’s all atoms, not bits. This construction—“ atoms” versus “bits”—originated with the work of a number of thinkers from the MIT Media Lab, starting with its founder, Nicholas Negroponte, and today most prominently exemplified by Neal Gershenfeld and the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms. It is shorthand for the distinction between software and hardware, or information technology and Everything Else. Today the two are increasingly blurring as more everyday objects contain electronics and are connected to other objects, the so-called Internet of Things. That’s part of what we’ll be talking about here. But even more, we’ll look at how it’s changing manufacturing, otherwise known as the flippin’ Engine of the World Economy. The idea of a “factory” is, in a word, changing. Just as the Web democratized innovation in bits, a new class of “rapid prototyping” technologies, from 3-D printers to laser cutters, is democratizing innovation in atoms. You think the last two decades were amazing? Just wait.”

DIY #Maker

DIY
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Bi Sh
Design Invention Research
 · KathmanduNepal
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really inspiring Rick Stone… now its on my reading list too… thanks for sharing…
These are really amazing possibilities many of which are realized and many are being realized and as being pointed amazing ones are still coming… sounds like good time ahead for everyone… because it is going to expand literally everyone’s limit…
…what about the possible risks? that we need to be aware of if any that can loom upon because of new things as discussed?

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Rick Stone
Community Helper, Finance Guy, Ex-Lawyer
 · New YorkU.S.
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Bi Sh anytime you are involved in a community where you are meeting strangers, one of the most important issues will be trust. In an online community, trust has different implications. On one hand it relates to trusting someone’s integrity, i.e…, their “trustworthiness.” On the other hand, it relates to trusting that someone has the credentials they claim to have. Every online community including Collaborizm has to address both of these facets of trust. Presumably, Collaborizm is going to further develop its upvoting system into a full fledged credentialing system whereby users establish credible online reputation.

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Bi Sh
Design Invention Research
 · KathmanduNepal
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very helpful indeed… thanks again…

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Bi Sh
Design Invention Research
 · KathmanduNepal
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regarding possible risks,
How to avoid possible Misuse of the Possibilities? for example, people might used Drones for Criminal Activities… Pokemon Go players were recently mogged using the Game and Drones!! Some players end up seeing Dead Copses too!!
Some kind of Universal as well as Local Regulating Policies might be needed to address these issues i think.

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